Geospatial Data Analysis and Simulation
Header

3D Buildings

September 1st, 2014 | Posted by Richard Milton in Uncategorized

I’ve been experimenting with 3D buildings in my virtual globe project and it’s now progressed to the point where I can demonstrate it working with dynamically loaded content. The following YouTube clip shows the buildings for London, along with the Thames. I didn’t have the real heights, so buildings are extruded up by a random amount and, unfortunately, so is the river, which is why it looks a bit strange. The jumps as it zooms in and out is me flicking the mouse wheel button, but the YouTube upload seems to make this and the picture quality a lot worse than the original:

Performance is an interesting thing as these movies were all made on my home computer rather than my iMac in the office. The green numbers show the frame rate. My machine is a lot faster as it’s using a Crucial SSD disk, so the dynamic loading of the GeoJSON files containing the buildings is fast enough to run in real time. The threading and asynchronous loading of tiles hasn’t been completed yet, so, when new tiles are loaded, the rendering stalls briefly.

On demand loading of building tiles is a big step up from using a static scene graph. The way this works is to calculate the ground point that the current view is over and render a square of nine tiles centred on the viewer’s ground location. Calculation of latitude, longitude and height from 3D Cartesian coordinates is an interesting problem that ends up having to use the Newton-Raphson approach. This still needs some work as it’s obvious from the movies that not enough content ahead of the viewer is being drawn. As the view moves around, the 3×3 grid of ground tiles is shuffled around and any new tiles that are required are loaded into the cache.

Working on the principle that tiles are going to be loaded from a server, I’ve had to implement a data cache based on the file URI (just like MapTubeD does). When tiles are requested, the GeoJSON files are moved into the local cache, loaded into memory, parsed, triangulated using Poly2Tri, extruded and converted into a 3D mesh. Based on how long the GeoJSON loading is taking on my iMac, a better solution is to pre-compute the 3D geometry to take the load off of the display software. At the moment I’m using a Java program I created to make vector tiles (GeoJSON) out of a shapefile for the southeast of England. I’ve assumed the world to be square (-180,-180 to 180,180 degrees) then cut the tiles using a quadtree system so that they’re square in WGS84. Although this gives me a resolution problem and non-square 3D tiles, it works well for testing. The next step is to pre-compute the 3D content and thread the data loading so it works at full speed.

Finally, this was just something fun I did as another test. Earth isn’t the only planet, other planets are available (and you can download the terrain maps)…

 

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 You can leave a response, or trackback.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *